Home > Uncategorized > Labor And Reward In Science: Commentary on Cassidy Sugimoto’s Program on Information Science Talk

Labor And Reward In Science: Commentary on Cassidy Sugimoto’s Program on Information Science Talk

Labor And Reward In Science: Commentary on Cassidy Sugimoto’s Program on Information Science Talk

Cassidy Sugimoto is Associate Professor in the School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University Bloomington, where researches within the domain of scholarly communication and scientometrics, examining the formal and informal ways in which knowledge producers consume and disseminate scholarship. She presented this talk, entitled Labor And Reward In Science: Do Women Have An Equal Voice In Scholarly Communication? A Brown Bag With Cassidy Sugimoto, as part of the Program on Information Science Brown Bag Series.

In her talk, illustrated by the slides below, Sugimoto highlights the roots of gender disparities in science.

 

Sugimoto abstracted her talk as follows:

Despite progress, gender disparities in science persist. Women remain underrepresented in the scientific workforce and under rewarded for their contributions. This talk will examine multiple layers of gender disparities in science, triangulating data from scientometrics, surveys, and social media to provide a broader perspective on the gendered nature of scientific communication. The extent of gender disparities and the ways in which new media are changing these patterns will be discussed. The talk will end with a discussion of interventions, with a particular focus on the roles of libraries, publishers, and other actors in the scholarly ecosystem..

In her talk, Sugimoto stressed a number of patterns in scientific publication:

  • Demise of single authorshop complicates notions of credit, rewards, labor, and responsibility
  • There are distincted patterns of gender disparity in scientific publications: Male-authored publications predominate in most field (with a few exceptions such as Library Science); women collaborating more domestically than internationally on publication; and woman-authored publications tend to be cited less (even within the same tier of journals).
  • Looking across categories of contribution — the most isolated is performing the experiment. And Women are most likely to fill this role. Further, if we look across male-and-female led teams, we see that the distribution of work across these teams varies dramatically.
  • When surveying teams — women tended to value all of the forms of contributions more than men with one exception. Women judge technical work, which is more likely to be conducted by women, as less valuable.
  • Composition of authorship has consequences for what is studied. Womens’ research focuses more often than men on areas relevant to both genders or to women.

Sugimoto notes that these findings are consistent with pervasive gender discrimination. Further, women as well as men frequently discriminate against other women — for example, in evaluation of professionalism, evaluation of work, and in salary offers

Much more detail on these points can be found in Sugimoto professional writings.

Sugimoto’s talk drew on a variety of sources: publication data in the Web of Science; from acknowledgement and authorship statements in PLOS journals. Open bibliometric data, such as that produced by PLOS, the Initiative for Open Citation, and various badging initiatives can help us to more readily bring disparities to light.

At the conclusion of her talk, Sugimoto suggested the following roles for librarians:

Sugimoto’s talk drew on a variety of sources: publication data in the Web of Science; from acknowledgement and authorship statements in PLOS journals. Open bibliometric data, such as that produced by PLOS, the Initiative for Open Citation, and various badging initiatives can help us to more readily bring disparities to light.

  • Use and promote open access in training sessions
  • Provide programming that lessens barriers to participation for women and minorities
  • Advocate for contributorship models which recognize the diversity of knowledge production
  • Approach new metrics with productive skepticism
  • Encourage engagement between students and scholars
  • Evaluate and contribute to the development of new tools

Reflecting the themes of Sugimato’s talk, the research we conduct here, in the Program on Information Science is strongly motivated by issues of diversity and inclusion — particularly on approaches to bias-reducing systems design. Our previous work in participative mapping aimed at increasing broad public participation in electoral processes. Our current NSF-supported work in educational research focuses on using eye-tracking and other biological signals to track fine-grained learning across populations of neurologically diverse learners. And, under a recently-awarded IMLS award, we will be hosting a workshop to develop principles for supporting diversity and inclusion through information architecture in information systems. For those interested in these and other projects, we have published blog posts and reports in these areas.

Categories: Uncategorized
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: