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Guest Post: Diana Hellyar on Library Use of New Visualization Technologies

April 26, 2016 Leave a comment

Diana Hellyar  who is a Graduate Research Intern in the program, reflects on her investigations into augmented reality, virtual reality, and related technologies

Libraries Can Use New Visualization Technology to Engage Readers

My research as a Research Intern for the MIT Libraries Program on Information Science is focused on the applications of emerging virtual reality and visualization technology to library information discovery. The area of virtual reality and other visualization technology is a rapidly changing field. Staying on top of these technologies and applying them into libraries can be difficult since there is little research on the topic. While I was researching the uses of virtual reality in libraries, I came across an example of how some libraries were able to incorporate augmented reality into their children’s department. Out of a dozen examples, this one caught my attention for many reasons. This example is not just a prototype; it was being used in multiple libraries. It was also easily adopted by non-technical librarians and was easy enough to be used by children.

The mythical maze app (available here) has been downloaded more than 10,000 times to date. Across the United Kingdom children participated in the Reading Agency’s 2014 Summer Reading Challenge, Mythical Maze, by downloading the Mythical Maze app on their mobile devices. Liz McGettigan discusses the app in an article published on the Charter Institute of Library and Information Professions website by explaining how it uses augmented reality to make posters and legend cards around the library come to life. The article links to The Reading Agency’s promotional video (watch it here). The video discusses how mythical creatures are hidden around the library and how children can look for these mythical creatures with their app. If they find the creatures, they can use the app to unlock mini-games. The app also allows children to scan stickers they receive from reading books, which unlocks rewards and allows children to learn more about the mythical creatures.

Using apps and integrating augmented reality is a fun way to do a summer reading challenge. The Reading Agency reported that 2014 was record-breaking year for their program. They state that participation increased by 3.6% and that 81,908 children joined the library to participate in the program, up 22.7% from the previous year. These statistics show that children are responding positively to augmented reality in their libraries.

I think that the best part about this app is that it allows the children’s room to come alive. Children can interact with the library in a way they never have been before.  Encouraging children to use their devices in the library in a fun and educational way is groundbreaking. They may never have been allowed to play with and learn from their devices at the library before.

The article about the summer reading challenge also discussed the idea of “transliteracy”. The author, Liz McGettigan, says that transliteracy is defined as the “ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms and tools”. It’s important to encourage children to learn how to use their devices to find the information they are looking for. Encouraging children to use their devices for the summer reading challenge helps them to learn how to do this.

What can libraries do with this? I think that libraries can learn from this example and not just for a summer reading program. The librarians can create scavenger hunts for kids that are either for fun or to help them learn about the library and its services. Children can collect prizes for the things they find in the library using the app. Librarians can even use it to have kids react to and rate the books they read. An app can be designed so that if a child hovers their device over a book they can see other children’s ratings and comments about the book. They can do any of these things and more to create new excitement for their library.

One way for this to work would be if publishers teamed up with libraries to create content for similar apps. Then, there would be many more possibilities for interactive content without worrying about copyright issues. Libraries could create a small section of books that would be able to interact with the app. Then, with the device hovered over a book, the story comes to life and is read to them.

There are so many possibilities for teaching, learning, and reading  while using augmented reality in children’s departments of libraries. The Mythical Maze summer reading program is hopefully only the beginning in terms of using this technology to engage children. With the success of the summer reading challenge, I hope other libraries will consider including it in their programming. Using this technology will only enhance learning and will create fun new ways to get children excited about reading.

This example illustrates the possibility of using augmented reality to engage in new visualization technologies. Many types of libraries can implement this technology and allow their users to interact with physical materials in a way they never have before.

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Guest Post: Lucy Taylor on LibrePlanet 2016, Software Curation, and Presevation

April 21, 2016 Leave a comment

Lucy Taylor,  who is a Graduate Research in the program, reflects on software curation at the recent LibrePlanet Conference:

LibrePlanet 2016, Software Curation and Preservation

This year’s LibrePlanet conference, organized by the Free Software Foundation, touched on a number of themes that relate to research on software curation and preservation taking place at MIT’s Program on Information Science.

The two day conference hosted at MIT aimed to “examine how free software creates the opportunity of a new path for its users, allows developers to fight the restrictions of a system dominated by proprietary software by creating free replacements, and is the foundation of a philosophy of freedom, sharing, and change.” In a similar way, at the MIT program on Information Science, we are investigating the ways in which sustainable software might positively impact academic communities and shape future scholarly research practices. This was a great opportunity to compare and contrast the concerns and goals of the Free Software movement with those who use software in research.

A number of recurring themes emerged over the course of the weekend that could inform research on software curation. The event kicked off with a conversation between Edward Snowden and Daniel Kahn Gillimor. They tackled privacy and security, and spoke at length about how current digital infrastructures limit our freedoms. Interestingly, they also touched on how to expand the Free Software community and raise awareness with non technical folks about the need to create, and use, Free Software. A lack of incentives for “newbies” inhibits the growth of the Free Software movement; Free Software needs to compete with proprietary software’s low entry levels and user experience. Similarly, the growth of sustainable, reusable, academic software through better documentation, storage, and visibility is inhibited by a lack of incentives for researchers and libraries to improve software development practices and create curation services.

The talks “Copyleft for the next decade: a comprehensive plan” by Bradley Kuhn and “Will there be a next great Copyright Act?” by Peter Higgins both examined the ways in which licensing and copyright are impacting the Free Software movement. The future seems somewhat bleak for GPL licensing and copyleft  with developers being discouraged from using this license, and instead putting their work under more permissive licenses which then allow companies to use and profit from other’s software. In comparison, research gateways like NanoHub and HubZero encounter the same difficulties in encouraging researchers to make their software freely available to others to use and modify. As both speakers touched on, the general lack of understanding, and also fear, surrounding copyright needs to be remedied. Scihub was also mentioned as an example of a tool that, whilst breaking copyright law, is also revolutionary in nature in that no library has ever aggregated more scientific literature on one platform. How can we create technologies that make scholarly communication more open in the future? Will the curation of software contribute to these aims? Within wider discussions on open access, it is also worthwhile to think about how software can often be a research object in its own right that merits the same curation and concern as journal papers and datasets.

The ideas discussed in the session “Getting the academy to support free software and open science” had many parallels to the research being carried out here at the MIT Program on Information Science. The three speakers spoke about Free Software activities within their home institutions and the barriers that are created by the heavy use of proprietary software at universities. Not only does the continued use of this software result in high costs and the perpetuation of the “centralized web” that relies on companies like Google, Microsoft, and Apple, but this also encourages students to think passively about the technologies they use. Instead, how can we encourage students to think of software as something they can build on and modify through the use of Free Software? Can we develop more engaged academic communities who think and use software critically through the development of software curation services and sustainable software practices? This was a really interesting discussion that explored problematic infrastructures in higher education.

Finally, Alison Macrina and Nima Fatemi’s talk on the “Library Freedom Project: the long overdue partnership between libraries and free software” put the library front and centre in the role of engaging the wider community in Free Software and advocating for better privacy and more freedom. The Library Freedom Project not only educates librarians and patrons on internet privacy but has also rolled out Tor browsers in a few public libraries. What can academic libraries do to build on this important work and to increase awareness about online freedom within our communities?

The conference was a great way to gain insight into the wider activities of the software community and to talk with others from a multitude of different disciplines. It was interesting to think about how research on software curation services could be informed by these broader discussions on the future of Free Software. Academic librarians should also think about how they can advocate for Free Software in their institutions to encourage better understanding of privacy and to foster environments in which software is critically evaluated to meet user needs. Can libraries embrace the Free Software movement as they have the Open Access movement?

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